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No. 4: Chorus, with Solos

"In a doleful train"

Midi Symbol MIDI File [38 KB, 4' 55 "]

Bunthorne enters, followed by Maidens, two and two, singing and playing on harps as before. He is composing a poem, and quite absorbed. He sees no one, but walks across the stage, followed by Maidens. They take no notice of Dragoons - to the surprise and indignation of those Officers.

Maidens.
In a doleful train
Two and two we walk all day -
For we love in vain!
None so sorrowful as they
Who can only sigh and say,
Woe is me, alackaday!
Woe is me, alackaday!

Dragoons.
Now is not this ridiculous, and is not this preposterous?
A thorough-paced absurdity - explain it if you can.
Instead of rushing eagerly to cherish us and foster us,
They all prefer this melancholy literary man.
Instead of slyly peering at us,
Casting looks endearing at us,
Blushing at us, flushing at us, flirting with a fan;
They're actually sneering at us, fleering at us, jeering at us!
Pretty sort of treatment for a military man!
They're actually sneering at us, fleering at us, jeering at us!
Pretty sort of treatment for a military man!

Angela.

Mystic poet, hear our prayer,
Twenty love-sick maidens we -
Young and wealthy, dark and fair,
All of county family.
And we die for love of thee -
Twenty love-sick maidens we!

Maidens.

Yes, we die for love of thee -
Twenty love-sick maidens we!

Lady Angela (Nellie Briercliffe) (1919-20)
Click on picture to enlarge

Henry Lytton as Bunthorne
Click picture to enlarge

Bunthorne. (aside, slyly)

Though my book I seem to scan
In a rapt ecstatic way,
Like a literary man
Who despises female clay,
I hear plainly all they say,
Twenty love-sick maidens they!

Dragoons. (to each other)

He hears plainly all they say,
Twenty love-sick maidens they!


Saphir.
Though so excellently wise,
For a moment mortal be,
Deign to raise thy purple eyes
From thy heart-drawn poesy.
Twenty love-sick maidens see -
Each is kneeling on her knee!

Maidens. (kneeling)
Twenty love-sick maidens see-
Each is kneeling on her knee!

Martyn Green as Bunthorne (1930s)
Martyn Green

Bunthorne. (aside)

Though, as I remarked before,
Any one convinced would be
That some transcendental lore
Is monopolizing me,
Round the corner I can see
Each is kneeling on her knee!

Dragoons. (to each other)

Round the corner he can see
Each is kneeling on her knee!

Now is not this ridiculous, and is not this preposterous?
A thorough-paced absurdity - ridiculous!
preposterous!
Explain it if you can.

ENSEMBLE.

Maidens. Dragoons.
In a doleful train Now is not this ridiculous, and is not this preposterous?
Two and two we walk all day, A thorough-paced absurdity, explain it if you can.
For we love in vain! Instead of rushing eagerly to cherish us and foster us,
None so sorrowful as they They all prefer this melancholy literary man.
Who can Instead of slyly peering at us,
only Casting looks endearing at us,
sigh and say, Blushing at us, flushing at us, flirting with a fan;
Woe is me, They're actually sneering at us, fleering at us, jeering at us!
Alack-a-day! Pretty sort of treatment for a military man!
Woe is me, They're actually sneering at us, fleering at us, jeering at us!
Alack-a-day! Pretty sort of treatment for a military man!
Twenty love-sick maidens we, Now is not this ridiculous, and is not this preposterous?
And we They all prefer this melancholy literary man.
die for love of Now is not this ridiculous, and is not this preposterous?
thee! They all prefer this melancholy,
Yes, we die melancholy literary man.
for love of thee! Now is not this ridiculous, and is not this preposterous?

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